Friday, October 8, 2010

StudentORLearner

from a David Warlick blog post




                           Students                                       Learners
Relationship with educatorsStudents are employees, required to obediently follow instructions.Learners are citizens with a vested interest in the learning society.
Relationship with other “Students”Students are competitorsLearners are collaborators
MotivationObligation: Students are culturally obliged to work for the teacher & for compensation(below)Responsibility: Learners are motivated by an understood and realized “value” in their work, especially when it is valuable to others.
CompensationInstitution defined grades and gateways to college (another institution) and a good job (another institution)A sense of ongoing accomplishment that is not delivered but earned, and not symbolic but tangible and valuable — an investment.
Mode of OperationCompliant, group-disciplined, objective-oriented, and trainablePersevering, self-disciplined, group- and goal-oriented, resourceful, and learning in order to achieve rather thanachieving learning.
Why?CompelledCurious
Equipped..with packaged knowledge and tools for recording packaged knowledge — prescribed and paced learning..with tools for exploring a networked variety of content, experimenting with that content, and discovering, concluding, and constructing knowledge — invented learning
AssessmentMeasuring what the student has learned.Measuring what the learner can do with what has been learned.



One of the problems that I struggled with, as I was writing and ordering these qualities was that I wanted to put assessment, for the student, at the top of the list — and assessment, for the learner, at the bottom. For the student, assessment is king, in very much the same way that quality control is such a critical part of the manufacturing processes. But assessment, for learners, is much less obvious, and at the same time, it is much more integral to the learning. Assessment for classrooms of learners is the enormous amounts of qualitative data that is collected by the teacher (and other students) on a minute-by-minute bases.
Assessment is also, and this is what I find most interesting, not a “right” or a “wrong” — a check (√) or an X. It is a simple self-asked question, “Did that work?”



Which are you in Physics? other classes? Are we evolving? Which is better? Which is Mr.Shircliff?  Which does he want you to be?

25 comments:

jharris11 said...
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Trisha said...

I'm a student. I learn better when I'm given instructions and am told what to do. I'm the same way in all my classes. I like to know about a topic before I start projects on it. I think people are evolving slowly. It depends on the person to tell what method is better. Mr. Shircliff is a learner and would like me to be a learner, but it's tough because over the years teachers haven't taught this way and I'm not used to it. With other students it's the same, we've all been in the same district and other teachers just teach and don't promote the learning aspect.

Jennifer's Blog said...

I definitely fall under the category of a student because that is the way our school system is set up. We have to follow specific guidelines in order to get good grades, go to college, and get a job. This has been constantly preached to us since a young age and has become part of our life, so it's difficult to change to a learner like Mr. Shircliff, even though he is trying to help improve our critical thinking skills.
Some colleges are starting to evolve to encourage learners, though. Honors classes at colleges encourage discussion and are directed at students who love learning. The difference between Buckeye and colleges, however, is that at college, students are able to choose subjects that they truly enjoy learning about, rather than classes they are forced to take.
I also agree that a combination of both would be best because some people simply aren't motivated like learners are. One option is to have separated classes for learners and students, much like we have now, but with teachers that have been trained to promote the learners. This way the students aren't penalized for being someone they're not, but the learners can still succeed and continue to be challenged.

Jessica Z. said...

I am more of a student. Although I enjoy learning new things in school, I strive to get good grades and perform well on tests. A learner usually focuses on only one subject and intensifies his or her learning in that area. Poor grades or a lack of knowledge in other subjects would result because the learner would not have enough time to fully explore every subject. Therefore, it would be better to be a student in some areas because the student would strive to learn all of the subjects. However, the student must have some qualities of the learner to appreciate all that is taught. Mr. Shircliff wants us to be learners, but most or all students worry about their grades rather than studying intensely on one area. Many students have several activities that take up a great deal of time, so it is difficult to fully explore all the knowledge that is in the world.

Brett Rodgers, BHS said...

I tend to be more of a student than a learner. I think the school system molds most people that way, since everything is based around our grades, and our generation is so pressed to get those grades so they can go to college, and we all have to get those top jobs, it is hard to think otherwise. However, I see a learner as being "better" because it is more of what you want to do, and not so much what society says. Also, you have a more vested interest in society and are willing to try new approaches rather than only following instructions. Under certain circumstances, I do much better with instructions, and sometimes, I would rather be let go to do what I see fit. Being in high school poses a problem for most people to become learners, as Mr. Shircliff is.

cwolff11 said...

I am definitely more of a student. I work and learn best when I have a set guideline or instruction to follow. It has been hard for me to adjust to the learning environment in Physics class. It's because I am not used to being a learner, like Mr. Shircliff wants us to be. I have used critical thinking skills before, but he wants us to apply them in his classroom. A combination of student/learner would be best because a student has the drive to do well in school and get good grades, and a learner has the motivation to comprehend the material. It's hard though to find the perfect balance between the two, because everyone learns differently

Brianna said...

I am more of a student. Most people who are recieving an education have grown up being a student. To change from being a student to a learner can be difficult because our society has raised us to be students and we do not want to be out of our comfort zones. To be only a learner would be difficult because in high school people have to take some classes that they are not always interested in taking. Even though Mr. Shircliff wants us to be learners, I think that there should be a mixture of being a student and a learner, so we want to do well in all subjects and are also able to use the material we have learned. When there is a mixture of ways of learning people will not be stuck in one comfort zone. In order to change into a learner we need to have an open mind about work we are assigned. We should hold a high expectation for ourselves, but it needs to be a realstic expectation. If we have no motivation to be a learner, then we will never change. The teacher cannot make us change into a learner, we need to achieve being a learner on our own.

Brianna said...

I am more of a student. Most people who are recieving an education have grown up being a student. To change from being a student to a learner can be difficult because our society has raised us to be students and we do not want to be out of our comfort zones. To be only a learner would be difficult because in high school people have to take some classes that they are not always interested in taking. Even though Mr. Shircliff wants us to be learners, I think that there should be a mixture of being a student and a learner, so we want to do well in all subjects and are also able to use the material we have learned. When there is a mixture of ways of learning people will not be stuck in one comfort zone. In order to change into a learner we need to have an open mind about work we are assigned. We should hold a high expectation for ourselves, but it needs to be a realstic expectation. If we have no motivation to be a learner, then we will never change. The teacher cannot make us change into a learner, we need to achieve being a learner on our own.

Sierra said...

I am more of a student. However, I have some learner qualities. In school we are required to follow instuctions from teachers. This makes us students. I do have the habit of competing for grades and just learning and doing things to get a good grade. Most of the time I will forget what I did a few months ago, because at the time I took in the information just to get the good grade. I believe that learners take from the education more. In physics I am trying to become more like a learner, because in physics, you can't just be handled information and study it. Physics requires you to see, observe, and take from the experience in a different way. Math I am definately a student. I am given equations, and formulas to know how to do the problems. I think Mr. Shircliff is a learner, because he likes to observe things farther, go beyond, and take from things based on curious. I think he wants us to be learners. This is because he wants us to take from all the things we do in the class, and go beyond the instuctions and problem.

PhysicsLuke said...
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James said...

Am I a student or learner? It is a hard question. I find myself in the middle, at least overall. There are some subjects in school that I find just plain boring and others I am truly interested in. In boring subjects, I find myself to be a student, without a doubt. I just want to achieve the grade and get it over with. I don't plan on studying and I expect the teacher or teachers to tell me exactly what to do. However, in more interesting classes I believe I am a learner. If a subject is interesting I find it more enjoyable to learn by asking questions and trying to acquire the knowledge. To be perfectly honest, I find it incredibly easier to learn in an interesting subject than a boring one. Interest is the pursuing factor in education. I find it extremely important to achieve the best grade as possible, but I also find it important to learn a great amount of information.
I find physics to be a learning class more than a student class. The class is more different than any other that I have ever taken. I expected the class to be boring and have much more academic learning than hands on. This is clearly not the case. Mr. Shircliff wants everyone to be a learner in his class, not just a student. My personal opinion is that he has succeeded in this goal. Building different projects with groups allow everyone to learn in a friendly and a fun environment. Many classes are dry and boring, but physics is hands on and draws my attention. It is important to have more learning environments because it is easier to understand and to secure the knowledge that is learned during class.

jharris11 said...

(I cannot figure out how to edit my previous comment.)I am probably more of a student in all of my classes, although I exhibit the some of the qualities of a learner, especially in the classes I enjoy. I think that is what schools encourage with the grading system that we have. From the time we start school, we are told that a certain grade means you did well while another means you did poorly. Eventually, most of us figure out that if we can regurgitate the information we have recently "learned" in class, we will do well on the tests. Once the test is over, the vast majority of the information is promply forgotton and replaced by the new subject. This is just how the school competition works. If you do not compete, you do not get into college. Many jobs now will no longer accept workers without some kind of degree. This leaves us with the dilemma of enjoying learning and barely scraping by in life or conforming to the system that is set up so that we can acquire everything that we need.
I think a combination of both would probably be best. A pass/fail design in school might encourage people to be learners rather than students. It would take some of the pressure off trying to attain a certain grade rather than doing well and enjoying the subject. It would still provide some method of evaluation, though. However, all methods of grading/evaluating will likely have some flaws.
Mr. Shircliff would like us to be learners, which is what he tries to be, but he is not really in a situation at school where he can freely promote that. He must grade us to some degree so that he has something to report to the school for our report cards. If he graded everyone on a pass/fail system, he might be punished by the school because that method does not follow the same format as the rest of the school.

griffin said...

In physics I find myself as more of a learner. Since the work is project based and involves very little homework and tests it is more of a learning proccess, than a grade. Also Assignments are given weeks before they are due, so the independent nature of the work ispires more learning and less mandatory working.In other classes i find myself to be a astudent. i do the work to get it done, not to lean and take information from it. I think we are not evolving, society is becoming more inclined to accept student. Everything schools do are for better grades, to get into a beter college, to get a better job. The stress is on grades, not learning. The idea of everyone being a learner is better, but the actual fullfilment of this idea is the difficult part. The change from students to learns would be a long proccess, and take a large revolution throughout the country. Mr.Shircliff wants his students to be learners. grades are less important than what is discovered from the projects and work.

Samantha said...

I would say I'm more of a student. In all of my classes, I like to know about a topic before further researching. Background information allows me to focus more on what I am actually looking into to. I don't think people are evolving. It is hard to adapt to a new method when you already have the mindset of a student. It is probably better to be a learner, though, because then your mind will wander and the curiosity will force you to learn more about a topic. One would not have to be forced to do something, because they will already want to learn more. Mr. Shircliff, a learner, would like me to be a learner, as well. He wants us to learn from experience. He wants us to be able to learn from mistakes and the ability to fix them. He wants our curiosity to allow us to investigate a situation.

PhysicsLuke said...

I'm naturally a learner, but occasionally fall into the student mindset when school becomes overwhelming, especially when I cannot relate to the topic. I feel less compelled to education rather than curious. Many of the projects and lessons that have been part of my classes I had already studied out of my curiosity rather than requirement. Of course there are aspects to education that I have absolutely no idea about, but when it comes to "sidenote" items, I usually have a considerable amount of interest in that rather than the base of the assignment. As most of my fellow students may know, I find myself getting extremely excited about certain projects that interest me, not only with a will to succeed, but also with a will to go above the requirements. (This is usually interpreted as over-zealousness, but that is not a problem; I'd much rather display my passion for creativity rather than fall behind and do the absolute minimum requirement.)

When I'm under serious stress, I tend to fall to the minimum requirements like a typical student, but when I have a wide and free time table, I am very much like a learner, looking at as many possibilities as I can before I begin to organize. By the time I accomplish my goals I have a better understanding of what was being asked and why we were taught this.

With strict curriculum guidelines, teachers seem inclined to teach by standard methods, to the detriment of both the educator and the pupil. Guidelines are necessary, but shouldn't be completely restrictive to standard methods, rather a combination. I may personally learn best through trial and error working at my own pace, but I cannot speak for everyone. Therefore, multiple options should be made available to educators and pupils to ensure knowledge is properly and applicably transferred.

Hopefully teachers in the future allow a flexible curriculum in order to assist all students in their individual methods of learning. If we stick to just student teaching, or just learner teaching, we would have no way of easily helping the students in between. If we combine rote learning with creative learning, we can ensure the best chances for education.

(This is the final draft of my comment; I cannot delete my previous post.)

Joe Szijarto said...

In the question of student or learner I find myself being more of a student. I tend to learn the subject that is currently presented to me and nothing more. It is far easier to learn the subject at hand and to use what was learned and apply it to simple questions. However taking the information learned and applying it to a completely different topic not only takes a good understanding of the subject but also the ability to realize the link between what was learned and how else it can be used.
In physics I am more of a learner than I am a student for one main reason it is the way in which the class is taught. In physics there is a focus on projects that implement ideas of physics such as the mousetrap cars, the rockets and the trebuchet rather than equations for acceleration, velocity, inertia, ect. we use physics in our learning rather than simply learning an equation and applying it to given information. I would like to be more of a learner however the time it requires is often more than what I have.
I believe the main focus in our educational career is to be a good student rather than a learner. I do not see this pattern in our educational system ending any time soon from elementary school children are condition in such a way as to be more of a student rather than a learner. I believe that it would be beneficial to America to change the educational system in a way that encourages children to be learners rather than students. Learners are much better that students for one reason, that learners take what was taught and can not only apply it to basic questions but can also take the information learned and apply it to other subjects. This is something that a student does not do, they make a direct link between what was taught and what it is used for, nothing else. Students do not expound upon what they learn they simply implement it.
Mr. Shircliff seems to me as a learner. I believe this simply because of his teaching method which encourages us to not be students but learners. There is no real focus on homework or tests but there is a focus on projects. Homework and tests would be encouraging a student mentality of learning an equation and using it, where as in our physics class there is a focus on projects that make the student implement ideas of physics into a working product.

rzacharias11 said...

On a personal level, I feel that I am a learner. I do not go to school and do all this homework and take advanced classes because I feel pressured to; I do it because I want to. Education is very important to me, and I have always had a desire to know and learn as much as I possibly can. Like the "learners," I want to know the purpose behind the things we do and create. In the future I want to be able to use my abilities to be able to help change our world for the better. However, I must admit that in some cases I am more of a "student." This is mostly because of the pressure that is felt from classes. I do care about my grades because they are important to my plans of going to college. Though I really want to learn the concepts, grades are significant. Our school environment is not a place that fosters "learners." It really only produces "students," who are searching for nothing more than that A, which is completely understandable. This is what Mr. Shircliff really wants to change. He is a "learner" because he enjoys hands on work and cares about understanding the process behind things. So, he is trying to make us understand that being a learner is superior to a student. Because what is the point of having an "A" if you have no idea how you got it?
In class I am usually a leaner. I am definitely a learner in AP Calculus because I love really figuring out why we calculate certain things and why we use the formulas we do. In physics I have been more of a student because I was concerned about keeping up grades, but more recently I have been trying to be a learner and not worry about whether or not that "A" comes along with it.

Taylor said...

Overall I am a student. That is how kids are raised to be. We are trained to come up with good grades and usually get talked to if we do not. In physics mr shircliff would like us to be learners like he is. he wants us not to worry about our grades and worry about learning something. in other classes, teachers incorporate both, they want to see us get good grades beacuse they know we want them and they want us to learn so we can take that with us in college. We are evolving slowly, we are learning to let go of grades and focus more on learning. it will be an extremely long time before we are fully evolved.

Joe Walker said...

For the most part I see myself as a learner as opposed to a student. When one looks back on their life to reflect upon their education many say yes, I did get pretty good grades in school but most do not remember very much of what they learned. That is one of the primary issues in our educational system today. Students are taught to conform to certain standards and are given little incentive to take interest in what they've learned. Its sad really. Often times we see students who have extreme talent and potential, but lack the personal drive and motivation to take an interest in their education. Personally, I try to take in interest in what I have learned in all of my classes, knowing some day I may have to use it in my continued education or future career as a military officer.

Students now I think are still being pressured to be like a "Student" as opposed to a "Learner". Grades and standards have been made out to be so very important in our educational system. A lot of times students just focus on meeting the standards and understanding the concepts enough to get by, they really could care less about truly comprehending the applicable use behind the knowledge.

Mr Shircliff, along with some other teachers across the country, are trying to evolve the educational system that makes students into "Learners" It is evident, at least for me, that his use of projects and labs to explain concepts, as opposed to textbook learning, clearly helps students take an interest in their education. Hopefully, more and more of the next generation of students will become learners, taking invested interest in what they have learned and applying it to their everyday lives .

thauser11 said...

I believe that I have grown to be a "student" over a "learner." I feel as though I work harder and better when I know what I am doing and what the purpose of me doing something is. The knowledge I already have and continue to attain builds further when I understand what I am accomplishing. As a student in the classroom over the years, teachers and other educators have taught us to follow directions, complete our work, and hopefully learn throughout the process.

Grades are based on the understanding of a topic rather than the interest in a topic. I think that a teacher feels better about their methods when their students are interested in a topic. Therefore, I feel that teachers encourage children to be "learners." Teachers want their students to understand but also want for them to go above and beyond with their interests in school subjects.

I feel that the best way to become more curious and a "learner," is to truly pay attention to your surroundings. When in class, listen to the teacher and actually think about what he or she is saying. Understand the meaning behind every sentence. If a child follows these guidelines, it should bring nothing but success to their education and satisfaction to their interests.

Emily said...

I think I have qualities of both a student and a learner.I think that being a learner is better because I think the students are more well rounded and focused on material they are learning. In school I focus on getting good grades,and I can say that I accomplish this for the most part because I do all work that has to be done and do it well.These qualities show in both physics and other classes However, I don't always retain the information that I am supposed to be learning, unless I find it very interesting.When this happens,not very often, I like to research the topic more.
This is what makes it so hard for teachers. Everybody has different interests so they can't make the lessons fun for all their students.Therefore, most all of the students are students. They just do the work to get the grade and don't want to do anymore work than they have to.
I think Mr.Shircliff is a learner. He seems interested in everything he talks about and always has something to show us about anything. He definitely wants his students to become learners, but that just isn't going to happen. The majority of the students in physics are taking most, if not all, advanced or Ap classes, not to mention hours that we put in to work either. To top it all off,we have a bunch of other homework to do for those classes so we tend to get the work done and not worry about looking the subject up further.It is definitely challenging balancing everything out. In the future I think people may start to realize the load we carry around and hopefully cut us some slack. That will enable future generations to become avid learners instead of students.

KYLE said...

I would have to say that i am primary a student in in all my classes. Since a young age teachers have never prompted us to learn our own methods. They always lay it out in black and white what you need to do. Where as Mr. Shircliff is trying to develope us into learners. Typically this would be a good thing, but due to the fact that we've had 11 years of being students this is a fairly new concept to most of us.

Mr. Shircliff is a definite learner that is the reason he is imposing this new idea on us. Which is not entirly a bad thing.

We are evovling slowly and as of now a letter is more important to us than actually learning something in the classes we take. most peple dont care about learning we just do what we have to do to get the grade. Which is why i think we are evovling slowly

KYLE said...

I would have to say that i am primary a student in in all my classes. Since a young age teachers have never prompted us to learn our own methods. They always lay it out in black and white what you need to do. Where as Mr. Shircliff is trying to develope us into learners. Typically this would be a good thing, but due to the fact that we've had 11 years of being students this is a fairly new concept to most of us.

Mr. Shircliff is a definite learner that is the reason he is imposing this new idea on us. Which is not entirly a bad thing.

We are evovling slowly and as of now a letter is more important to us than actually learning something in the classes we take. most peple dont care about learning we just do what we have to do to get the grade. Which is why i think we are evovling slowly

Shane said...

I view myself as a Student. Myself and others for that matter have been taught to do what the teacher and other students are the competetors. Grades are the only thing that matters and you have to get things done but what is told not by what you view right. I think that in all calsses i am a student, and a leaner you may have more freedom but you may not meet the proper critaria. Mr. Shircliff is a learner and he wants all of us to be learners.

c gatt22 said...

i believe i am a learner. i take in new concepts better when i look into them myself. when it talks about motivation i believe that people should "want" to learn concepts not just take it in because they have to. In Mr.shircliffs class we do experiments and do projects that are fun and we want to learn more about these concepts because they are fun or interesting to us.I i do believe we are moving towards most kids being students because they look at school as being forced into learning things.Mr. shircliff wants us to be learns because it makes us want to take in his concepts and to be curious.